Residential Cleaning
Commercial Cleaning
Upholstery Cleaning
Coupons
Tile and Grout
Carpet Repair
Our Guarantee
Urine Treatment
Green Cleaning
Spot Removal Guide
Testimonials
Common Questions

 

Case Presentation

 

By: Rutgers University
Why Clean Green
Case Studies
Poison Guide
Tulsa Green Cleaning

A 42-year-old female hired a professional carpet-cleaning company to clean the carpets in her home. The carpet-cleaning solution used was a sodium tripolyphosphate (TSP) solution, which also contained low levels of dipropylene glycol methyl ether (DPGME) and various fragrance compounds, mixed with water. The solution was applied to the carpets and upholstery in the home with a high pressure application wand. During most of the carpet-cleaning activity, the female remained in a bedroom with the door closed, isolated from the living room, which was being cleaned. When she reentered the house after leaving temporarily, she noticed a damp smell and an associated chemical odor as the carpet cleaning was being completed. She began to experience respiratory distress and facial discomfort within 5 min of returning to the home; this was immediately followed by shortness of breath, an asthma attack, and cyanosis. A witness present during the event (a certified emergency medical technician) described the patient as being semiconscious and having what appeared to be petit mal seizures: her eyes rolled, her feet and arms tightened, her hands clenched, her feet postured downward in an arch, and her entire body shook. An ambulance was called by the witness. Upon arrival, emergency personnel attempted to intubate the patient but were unsuccessful due to airway swelling. She was transported to the local emergency room via ambulance and was finally intubated in the emergency room. She was diagnosed with anaphylactic shock with respiratory failure secondary to carpet cleaning. The seizures were considered to be due to hypoxic encephalopathy. After 18 days of hospitalization, she was released.

The patient had been diagnosed with asthma at age 19, though the condition did not prevent normal activities and exercise throughout her twenties. She was a self-reported smoker from her teenage years through age 37. During her thirties, the patient reported that heavy physical exercise was increasingly likely to induce asthma attacks, and by her early forties, she was using oral and inhaled bronchodilators 2-3 times per day, more often during the winter than other seasons. The patient is considered atopic.

Since the asthma attack that followed the carpet-cleaning exposure, she has experienced persistent nocturnal and exertional asthma with reduced responsiveness to bronchodilators. She is steroid dependent and maintains an epinephrine anaphylactic kit for emergency use. She reports breathing difficulty when exposed to odors and consistent nocturnal awakening due to breathing difficulty. She self-administers Albuterol nebulizer (Ivax Corp., Miami, FL) treatments 3 times daily and Azmacort (Aventis Pharma AG, Frankfurt, Germany), an inhaled steroid, each morning and evening.

Since the asthma attack that followed the carpet-cleaning exposure, she has experienced persistent nocturnal and exertional asthma with reduced responsiveness to bronchodilators. She is steroid dependent and maintains an epinephrine anaphylactic kit for emergency use. She reports breathing difficulty when exposed to odors and consistent nocturnal awakening due to breathing difficulty. She self-administers Albuterol nebulizer (Ivax Corp., Miami, FL) treatments 3 times daily and Azmacort (Aventis Pharma AG, Frankfurt, Germany), an inhaled steroid, each morning and evening.

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5